Twelve Weeks

We just completed our 12th week of the school year. We’ve made necessary adjustments and have gotten into a great groove. We’re looking forward to a much needed fall break in about a week!

 

This is Caroline’s preferred position for reading.

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The kids have been learning the language of their choosing using an program called Duolingo. Elliot recently completed the “flirting” section and can now say phrases such as, “The coffee’s on me.” in German. ¬†That’ll be useful. ūüôĄ

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They have also been doing a cooking class with their cousins, taught by their wonderful Aunt Annie. They’ve been learning all sorts of great skills so they can be helping me more in the kitchen!

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Bring Your Bible to School (homeschool enrichment classes) Day

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Ruby never misses a day of school with us. She’s either providing support for a student…

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or helping me navigate the day’s lessons in the teacher’s manual. We love our schoolroom kitty!

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Beginner Writing

After discovering a few weeks into the school year that writing wasn’t coming quite so easy for Caroline and that my relaxed approach to creative writing for the earlier elementary grades that worked great with Elliot wasn’t a good fit for her, I started hunting for a resource that would help her. ¬†I came across Classical Academic Press and their Writing and Rhetoric Curriculum and after seeing the first level (for grade 3 or 4) is based on fables, I knew it would be perfect. ¬†Caroline absolutely loves Aesop’s fables. ¬†Each lesson focuses on one fable and uses its example to teach various writing concepts such as figurative writing, amplification, etc. With each lesson there are small exercises focusing on things like adding detail or using more interesting words, as well as copywork and dictation. ¬†At the end of the lesson (lasting one week, ideally) there’s a bigger writing exercise where the student puts their own spin on the fable they’ve been focusing on. The student might be asked to change the characters or add different details, or other changes that make the fable new and unique. Caroline is finally creating her own writing without feeling stressed or experiencing writer’s block. This curriculum gets her started, using something she already loves, and then she’s off and running once she understands what she is supposed to do. ¬†We’re really excited about this curriculum and will probably continue using the next few levels until she’s ready to move on to¬†Writing with Skill, around 6th grade.

 

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She’s learning how to use the thesaurus for finding lots of great word choices, as well as the dictionary to look up exact meanings of words she’s unsure of.

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Even though you can do all your writing in the book, she likes to put her big assignments on paper and create a cover with pictures.

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When life gives you fruitflies…

take out your microscope and get a closer look.

 

We’ve been experiencing a bit of a fruitfly invasion in our kitchen recently. Maybe it’s the unseasonably warm weather here in TX that’s bringing them in. We’ve been trapping them in cups of apple cider vinegar. ¬†The other day we decided it might be interesting to take a look at one of them under our microscope. We learned they are striped like bees and are quite hairy. Josh warned me I might regret knowing what these things look like and he’s probably right. I’m not going to be able to stop thinking about it the next time one buzzes around my food.

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